Prepositions (with verbs)

Prepositions (with verbs)

Often a verb changes meaning when used with different prepositions.

The following examples represent a short list of verbs and their associated prepositions.

Examples (1)

Example (1): The developers have appealed to the Department of the Environment.
‘… appeal to …’
Example (2): We’ll have to apply for a planning permission.
‘… apply for …’
Example (3): This regulation doesn’t apply to our case.
‘… apply to …’

Notes

Add the appropriate preposition to a verb to give it the intended meaning, for example:

  • ‘apply for’ means ‘to make a formal request’,
  • ‘apply to’ means ‘to be true or valid for’,

as in Examples (2) and (3).

More Examples (2)

Example (4): ´I don’t believe in change for change’s sake.
‘… believe in …’
Example (5): We would benefit from the wind farm.
‘… benefit from …’
Example (6): Please, carry on with the news.
‘… carry on …’
Example (7): The tests have to be carried out in time.
‘… carry out …’

Add the appropriate preposition to a verb to give it the intended meaning, for example:

  • ‘carry on’ means ‘go on or continue’ whereas
  • ‘carry out’ means ‘do or perform’,

as in Examples (6) and (7).

More Examples (3)

Example (8): The rotor cuts in at a certain wind speed.
‘… cut in …’
Example (9): The rotor cuts out when wind speeds are too high.
‘… cut out …’

Add the appropriate preposition to a verb to give it the intended meaning, for example:

  • ‘cut in’ means ‘begin or start rotating’;
  • ‘cut out’ means ‘stop rotating’,

as in Examples (8) and (9).

More examples (4)

Example (10): We are getting on with the tests. We’ll have to get on the train at six o’clock.
‘… get on …’
Example (11): You’ll have to get off the train at Swindon.
‘… get off …’
Example (12): Somebody’s got to look after the wind farm.
‘… look after …’
Example (13): Look at that windfarm five miles from here!
‘look at …’

Add the appropriate preposition to a verb to give it the intended meaning, for example:

  • ‘get on’ may mean ‘go on’ or ‘continue’ or ‘enter (a train or bus)’
  • ‘get off’ means ‘leave (a train or bus)’,

as in Examples (10) and (11);

  • ‘look after’ means ‘take care of’, whereas
  • ‘look at’ means ‘watch, see’,

as in Examples (12) and (13).

There are more prepositions that go with ‘look’, such as ‘look for’ for ‘search’, etc.

More examples (5)

Example (14): The noise nuisance results from insufficient insulation.
‘… result from …’
Example (15): Any prominent tones result in a penalty.
‘… result in …’

Add the appropriate preposition to a verb to give it the intended meaning, for example:

  • ‘result from’ means ‘be a consequence of’ whereas
  • ‘result in’ means ‘lead to’,

as in Examples (14) and (15).